Friday, November 12, 2010

If You Don't Answer Your Complaints, You'll Get A Bad Grade

Good Morning America ran a story this morning that says that parts of the Wolfgang Puck food empire got an F rating because he refused to pay.  Well, the real reason, AND ONLY REASON, that his cooking utensil company has an F is because his company won't answer his complaints.  He has two unanswered complaints. First of all, after that interview on Good Morning America, I'm sure that we will never accept Wolfgang Puck as a BBB Accredited Business.  However, if he answers his complaints, and remains unaccredited, he will have a much higher grade.  That is all there is to it.

So, Wolfgang, if you're listening: stop ignoring your complaints and answer your complaints.

[Edit: I just watched the whole Wolfgang Puck interview and he really just has no idea what we do or why he has an F.  He just assumed it was 'pay to play'.  He said he never talked to us, but the BBB sent his company at least two letters per complaint. So, I suppose this blog will be an explanation to him. I also changed the sentence that says he's ignoring his customers.  His company is ignoring complaints made by his customers.]

15 comments:

  1. Sorry but there are several other examples on the ABC news story that you can't blow off so easily. How about the company that paid you and went from a C to A+ overnight? Or the Puck restaurant Spago in LA that has B+ rating but no complaints. Or how about the fact that HAMAS business paid and you gave them an A rating? LOL...seems like your grading system is a joke.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The company that went from C to A+ answered their complaints. It's that simple. Seriously. As far as Hamas getting that A-? It was quite the mistake, but ask L.A. BBB. It wouldn't happen here.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The BBB is a bunch of crooks. How come the BBB has failed to answer any of the thousands of complaints filed against it? Hey BBB, if your listening, stop ignoring the consumers and answer your own complaints. The BBB is a scam and complete joke. Take a peek at this....

    www.bbbroundup.com

    Pretty much says it all....

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow, I just noticed that the BBB is deleting comments made that they don't like. Typical of the BBB standard operating procedures.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Perhaps you didn't notice that it said "awaiting moderation." bbbroundup is not a reliable source of information because of the sheer fact that completely ignore how companies respond to complaints. COMPLETELY. We have on EVERY SINGLE reliability report that the way complaints are responded to are often more important than the number. We also place the reasons for the rating conveniently under "BBB Rating."

    ReplyDelete
  6. Be sure to watch 20/20 tonight. more truths about the bbb to be exposed. Should be great!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Years ago, before the BBB had their rating system and before I was employed by the bureau, I was scammed by a BBB member on my wedding day. It was awful. I complained to the BBB. The business, not suprisingly, did not answer my complaint. All the BBB was able to do at the time was review her membership (it may have been taken away. I don't know.) If that happened today, the company's rating would be in jeopardy and I would have more of a voice as a consumer.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Answering complaints is just like improving something and taking it as a constructive criticism.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I worked for a short time for the BBB - yes it is pay to play. The franchise I worked within raised the grade when membership was purchased. I think phase two should be just how much of that membership money goes into commissions, on a good week the salesperson can get up to 49% of those fees on their paycheck as well as bonus and certainly never receives less than one-third. The BBB used to stand for something now it's simply another extension of the Wall Street mentality feeding off of the BBB's established reputation.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I can say that our BBB is not like that. There are steps that HAVE to be taken to raise a grade. I don't see how it's possible to raise someone's grade by paying. The only things that can raise someone's rating are abiding by the 17 standards. How would a company's rating improve if they still had unanswered or unresolved complaints?

    ReplyDelete
  11. You can be a racial organization and a terrorist organization with a Grade "A" rating as long as you pay the BBB to be a member.
    I have seen some shady businesses on the internet over the years with BBB membership. Even before this story aired on 20/20 I was never trustful of this organization.
    If a company has a BBB rating...don't expect it to mean anything. Ask for references and do your own due diligence. There just isn't any legitimate consumer advocacy group that profits from businesses.

    ReplyDelete
  12. This person (Anonymous) sounds bitter. I wonder if they were fired from the BBB for doing what they are so sure happens.

    ReplyDelete
  13. They weren't actually terrorist or racist organizations. They didn't exist, thus no track record at all. Nonetheless, I think that the Bureau that accredited them didn't perform due diligence and it turned around and bit them. I can only speak for KC, but here we require the business to be in business for one year and provide licensing information.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Aaron Reese said...

    There are steps that HAVE to be taken to raise a grade. I don't see how it's possible to raise someone's grade by paying.

    Mr. Reese, did you not see the video where the lady who owned an antique store had her grade raised from a C to an A+ in less then 24 hours after paying the BBB. Maybe you got up off the couch to grab a drink when they aired that part.
    From what I can tell from the many message boards, the people are not buying the BBB's excuses. The bbb will never be the same as long as Steve Cox is president. The man is a liar and it was exposed on national tv.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Believe me, I was glued to the set during the whole segment. That woman had a C because of an 'unresolved' complaint and limited information on her business. When companies apply for accreditation, they must appropriately respond to complaints an provide things like customer service contacts, ownership, valid phone numbers, etc. That would raise her rating.

    Once she answered her complaint, it would be reopened and thus unreportable until it is again closed. It's unfair to companies to report on complaints that can still be resolved. People have been concerned over the "disappearance" of complaints so frequently, that we've had to explain this publicly numerous times.

    Because she answered her unresolved complaint and updated her business information, her rating greatly increased. Also, that part of the segment was the most questionable. Notice you never hear anything from the other side of the phone? We only hear her ask the question "I have to pay to increase my grade?" and then it is cut off. If a sales rep from the BBB actually said "yes." That would surely have been aired then gone viral on the internet.

    In the case of a company responding to an 'unresolved' complaint in Kansas City, we make sure complaints are not RE-closed as unresolved before considering them for Accreditation. Accreditation would take approximately two weeks (if at all), not 24 hours.

    ReplyDelete