Monday, January 24, 2011

Scams of the Week: Jan 24, 2011

News9Consumer.com - It poses as a news site to trick people into thinking their information is accurate.  It's not.  They have advertisements all over the web. They look like the one below.
Notice that they also use two illegal images.  One, of course, is the President.  Using his unlicensed image in advertising is strictly forbidden under federal law.  The other picture is of French reporter Melissa Theurieu. I posted a blog about companies using her image HERE. These ads have code embedded within them that acquires web surfers' general whereabouts from IP addresses and then advertise fake programs and services in the their area. No matter where the web surfer is, it will mention his or her location. The site has content about extraordinarily inexpensive car insurance, diet and weight loss miracles, homeopathic remedies, work-at-home opportunities and many more schemes.  They are all false, misleading, and deceptive. I expected this group to fall off the earth by now, but they're sticking around and making money. Watch out for similar sites too.  I've run across strikingly similar channel 3, channel 12 and channel 5 sites.

IRS W-2 Scams - There are plenty of incarnations of the W-2 scam.  The online version asks users to "update" their tax form via email.  The email contains an attachment that loads computers with viruses and malware. The BBB issued a warning about the emails today which states quite accurately, "The IRS is not going to email you." There is an old-school mail version of the scam that is mostly mailed from out of the country and last year, a family of criminals was busted for administering a W-2 scam involving fraudulent checks. If you get mail from someone claiming to be the IRS from within the United States, contact the IRS on an official number and report fraud by following directions at the official IRS site.

2 comments:

  1. I figured as much. BUT msn.com has them as an advertiser

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  2. Yes. I've run across several reputable sites that have unscrupulous advertisers. I found the above banner ad on Huffingtonpost.com.

    ReplyDelete